Transitions to Capitalism in Early Modern Europe

Transitions to Capitalism in Early Modern Europe

A broad, comparative analysis of the impact of economic changes on European agriculture and industry, first published in 1997.

Author: Robert S. Duplessis

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521397731

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 329

View: 887

A broad, comparative analysis of the impact of economic changes on European agriculture and industry, first published in 1997.
Categories: Business & Economics

Transitions to Capitalism in Early Modern Europe

Transitions to Capitalism in Early Modern Europe

Revised, updated and expanded, this second edition analyzes the structures and practices of European economies within a global context.

Author: Robert S. DuPlessis

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108417655

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 384

View: 879

Revised, updated and expanded, this second edition analyzes the structures and practices of European economies within a global context.
Categories: Business & Economics

Capitalists in Spite of Themselves

Capitalists in Spite of Themselves

Capitalists in Spite of Themselves was the winner of the 2003 Distinguished Scholarly Publication Award of the American Sociology Association.

Author: Richard Lachmann

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780195159608

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 314

View: 523

Here, Richard Lachmann offers a new answer to an old question: Why did capitalism develop in some parts of early modern Europe but not in others? Finding neither a single cause nor an essentialist unfolding of a state or capitalist system, Lachmann describes the highly contingent development of various polities and economies. He identifies, in particular, conflict among feudal elites--landlords, clerics, kings, and officeholders--as the dynamic which perpetuated manorial economies in some places while propelling elites elsewhere to transform the basis of their control over land and labor. Comparing regions and cities within and across England, France, Italy, Spain, and the Netherlands from the twelfth through eighteenth centuries, Lachmann breaks new ground by showing step by step how the new social relations and political institutions of early modern Europe developed. He demonstrates in detail how feudal elites were pushed toward capitalism as they sought to protect their privileges from rivals in the aftermath of the Reformation. Capitalists in Spite of Themselves is a compelling narrative of how elites and other classes made and responded to political and religious revolutions while gradually creating the nation-states and capitalist markets which still constrain our behavior and order our world. It will prove invaluable for anyone wishing to understanding the economic and social history of early modern Europe. Capitalists in Spite of Themselves was the winner of the 2003 Distinguished Scholarly Publication Award of the American Sociology Association.
Categories: Business & Economics

Family Firms and Merchant Capitalism in Early Modern Europe

Family Firms and Merchant Capitalism in Early Modern Europe

In other words, it never developed the signal characteristics of capitalism,
markets for the “fictitious commodities” of land, ... in the Development of
Capitalism (New York 1946); Duplessis, Transitions to Capitalism in Early
Modern Europe; Jean ...

Author: Thomas Max Safley

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780429647932

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 288

View: 609

This fascinating study follows the fortunes of the Höchstetter family, merchant-manufacturers and financiers of Augsburg, Germany, in the late-fifteenth and early-sixteenth centuries, and sheds light on the economic and social history of failure and resilience in early modern Europe. Carefully tracing the chronology of the family’s rise, fall and transformation, it moves from the micro- to the macro-level, making comparisons with other mercantile families of the time to draw conclusions and suggest insights into such issues as social mobility, capitalist organization, business techniques, market practices and economic institutions. The result is a microhistory that offers macro-conclusions about the lived experience of early capitalism and capitalistic practices. This book will be valuable reading for advanced students and researchers of economic, financial and business history, legal history and early modern European history.
Categories: Business & Economics

Early Modern Europe 1450 1789

Early Modern Europe  1450 1789

Further reading An excellent introduction to economic developments in this era is
Robert S. Duplessis , Transitions to Capitalism in Early Modern Europe (
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press , 1997 ) . See also the classic studies
by ...

Author: Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521005213

Category: History

Page: 495

View: 725

Accessible, engaging textbook offering an innovative account of people's lives in the early modern period.
Categories: History

Freedom and Capitalism in Early Modern Europe

Freedom and Capitalism in Early Modern Europe

Mercantilism and the Making of the Modern Economic Mind Philipp Robinson
Rössner. age, this transition smacked of “Smithianism”, the new fashion in
political economy that had swept parts of the continent shortly after the Wealth of
Nations ...

Author: Philipp Robinson Rössner

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030533090

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 175

View: 765

This book hinges upon ideas and discourses variously known under labels such as “Mercantilism” and “Cameralism”. Often viewed as antithesis of capitalism, inclusive institutions and good economy in the “West”, this book re-assembles them and builds them into a coherent origin story of modern capitalism. It explores the field of intellectual and conceptual history, especially the history of Renaissance and Mercantilism in a longer history of capitalism. Rather than hindrances, the author argues that Mercantilist and Cameralist political economies presented essential stepping stones of modern capitalism, in Britain and beyond. This book will be of interest to academics and students in general economic history, the history of capitalism, economic development and the history of economic thought.
Categories: Business & Economics

How Revolutionary Were the Bourgeois Revolutions

How Revolutionary Were the Bourgeois Revolutions

Musgrave, The Early Modern European Economy, 51. whittle, The Development
of Agrarian Capitalism,310. Byres, Capitalism from Above and Capitalism from
Below,28,66–68; Manning, “The english Revolution and the transition from ...

Author: Neil

Publisher: Haymarket Books

ISBN: 9781608462650

Category: Political Science

Page: 840

View: 785

A historical defense of the concept of bourgeois revolution, from the sixteenth century to the twentieth.
Categories: Political Science

Guilds Innovation and the European Economy 1400 1800

Guilds  Innovation and the European Economy  1400   1800

... and early modern Europe no longer considers these institutions as obstacles to
the rise and expansion of capitalism.1 ... 1–40; Robert S. DuPlessis, Transitions
to Capitalism in Early Modern Europe (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press,
 ...

Author: S. R. Epstein

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139471077

Category: History

Page:

View: 649

For a long time guilds have been condemned as a major obstacle to economic progress in the pre-industrial era. This re-examination of the role of guilds in the early modern European economy challenges that view by taking into account fresh research on innovation, technological change and entrepreneurship. Leading economic historians argue that industry before the Industrial Revolution was much more innovative than previous studies have allowed for and explore the different products and production techniques that were launched and developed in this period. Much of this innovation was fostered by the craft guilds that formed the backbone of industrial production before the rise of the steam engine. The book traces the manifold ways in which guilds in a variety of industries in Italy, Austria, Germany, Switzerland, France, Belgium, the Netherlands, and Britain helped to create an institutional environment conducive to technological and marketing innovations.
Categories: History

Contesting the Renaissance

Contesting the Renaissance

The First Modern Economy: Success, Failure, and Perseverance of the Dutch
Economy, 1500-1815 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996).
Duplessis, Robert. Transitions to Capitalism in Early Modern Europe (Cambridge:
 ...

Author: William Caferro

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1444391321

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 940

In this book, William Caferro asks if the Renaissance was really a period of progress, reason, the emergence of the individual, and the beginning of modernity. An influential investigation into the nature of the European Renaissance Summarizes scholarly debates about the nature of the Renaissance Engages with specific controversies concerning gender identity, economics, the emergence of the modern state, and reason and faith Takes a balanced approach to the many different problems and perspectives that characterize Renaissance studies
Categories: History

Revolutions in the Atlantic World

Revolutions in the Atlantic World

Cf. Perez Zagorin, “Prolegomena to the Comparative History of Revolution in
Early Modern Europe,” Comparative ... Robert S. Duplessis, Transitions to
Capitalism in Early Modern Europe (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press,
1997), 53, ...

Author: Wim Klooster

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814748260

Category: History

Page: 247

View: 867

In the late eighteenth and early-nineteenth centuries, revolutions transformed the British, French, and Spanish Atlantic worlds. During this time, colonial and indigenous people rioted and rebelled against their occupiers in violent pursuit of political liberty and economic opportunity, challenging time-honored social and political structures on both sides of the Atlantic. As a result, mainland America separated from British and Spanish rule, the French monarchy toppled, and the world’s wealthiest colony was emancipated. In the new sovereign states, legal equality was introduced, republicanism embraced, and the people began to question the legitimacy of slavery. Revolutions in the Atlantic World wields a comparative lens to reveal several central themes in the field of Atlantic history, from the concept of European empire and the murky position it occupied between the Old and New Worlds to slavery and diasporas. How was the stability of the old regimes undermined? Which mechanisms of successful popular mobilization can be observed? What roles did blacks and Indians play? Drawing on both primary documents and extant secondary literature to answer these questions, Wim Klooster portrays the revolutions as parallel and connected uprisings.
Categories: History

Beyond Our Means

Beyond Our Means

Robert S. Duplessis, Transitions to Capitalism in Early Modern Europe (
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997), 136. 12. Duet, Caisses d'
épargne Françaises, 66–67. 13. George M. Foster, “Peasant Society and the
Image of Limited ...

Author: Sheldon Garon

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400839407

Category: History

Page: 488

View: 992

If the financial crisis has taught us anything, it is that Americans save too little, spend too much, and borrow excessively. What can we learn from East Asian and European countries that have fostered enduring cultures of thrift over the past two centuries? Beyond Our Means tells for the first time how other nations aggressively encouraged their citizens to save by means of special savings institutions and savings campaigns. The U.S. government, meanwhile, promoted mass consumption and reliance on credit, culminating in the global financial meltdown. Many economists believe people save according to universally rational calculations, saving the most in their middle years as they plan for retirement, and saving the least in welfare states. In reality, Europeans save at high rates despite generous welfare programs and aging populations. Americans save little, despite weaker social safety nets and a younger population. Tracing the development of such behaviors across three continents from the nineteenth century to today, this book highlights the role of institutions and moral suasion in shaping habits of saving and spending. It shows how the encouragement of thrift was not a relic of indigenous traditions but a modern movement to confront rising consumption. Around the world, messages to save and spend wisely confronted citizens everywhere--in schools, magazines, and novels. At the same time, in America, businesses and government normalized practices of living beyond one's means. Transnational history at its most compelling, Beyond Our Means reveals why some nations save so much and others so little. Some images inside the book are unavailable due to digital copyright restrictions.
Categories: History

Karl Marx s Social and Political Thought

Karl Marx s Social and Political Thought

38 Karl Marx on the Transition from Feudalism to Capitalism C.J. Katz Studies of
Marx's theory of history are complicated by ... historiography , where it guides his
analysis of the transition from feudalism to capitalism in early modern Europe .

Author: Bob Jessop

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 0415193281

Category: Communism

Page: 592

View: 338

Categories: Communism

Animal Oppression and Human Violence

Animal Oppression and Human Violence

Andre Gunder Frank, Capitalism and Underdevelopment in Latin America:
Historical Studies of Chile and Brazil (New York: ... Robert S. Duplessis,
Transitions to Capitalism in Early Modern Europe (Cambridge: Cambridge
University Press, ...

Author: David A. Nibert

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231525510

Category: Nature

Page: 352

View: 597

Jared Diamond and other leading scholars have argued that the domestication of animals for food, labor, and tools of war has advanced the development of human society. But by comparing practices of animal exploitation for food and resources in different societies over time, David A. Nibert reaches a strikingly different conclusion. He finds in the domestication of animals, which he renames "domesecration," a perversion of human ethics, the development of large-scale acts of violence, disastrous patterns of destruction, and growth-curbing epidemics of infectious disease. Nibert centers his study on nomadic pastoralism and the development of commercial ranching, a practice that has been largely controlled by elite groups and expanded with the rise of capitalism. Beginning with the pastoral societies of the Eurasian steppe and continuing through to the exportation of Western, meat-centered eating habits throughout today's world, Nibert connects the domesecration of animals to violence, invasion, extermination, displacement, enslavement, repression, pandemic chronic disease, and hunger. In his view, conquest and subjugation were the results of the need to appropriate land and water to maintain large groups of animals, and the gross amassing of military power has its roots in the economic benefits of the exploitation, exchange, and sale of animals. Deadly zoonotic diseases, Nibert shows, have accompanied violent developments throughout history, laying waste to whole cities, societies, and civilizations. His most powerful insight situates the domesecration of animals as a precondition for the oppression of human populations, particularly indigenous peoples, an injustice impossible to rectify while the material interests of the elite are inextricably linked to the exploitation of animals. Nibert links domesecration to some of the most critical issues facing the world today, including the depletion of fresh water, topsoil, and oil reserves; global warming; and world hunger, and he reviews the U.S. government's military response to the inevitable crises of an overheated, hungry, resource-depleted world. Most animal-advocacy campaigns reinforce current oppressive practices, Nibert argues. Instead, he suggests reforms that challenge the legitimacy of both domesecration and capitalism.
Categories: Nature

Marxist Shakespeares

Marxist Shakespeares

Duplessis, R. S. (1997) Transitions to Capitalism in Early Modern Europe,
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Dutton, R. (1991) Mastering the Revels:
The Regulation and Censorship of English Renaissance Drama, London:
Macmillan.

Author: Jean E. Howard

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134633043

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 320

View: 604

Marxist Shakespeares uses the rich analytic resources of the Marxist tradition to look at Shakespeare's plays afresh. The book offers new insights into the historical conditions within which Shakespeare's representations of class and gender emerged, and into Shakespeare's role in the global culture industry stretching from Hollywood to the Globe Theatre. A vital resource for students of Shakespeare which includes Marx's own readings of Shakespeare, Derrida on Marx, and also Bourdieu, Bataillle, Negri and Alice Clark.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Tropical Babylons

Tropical Babylons

Stols, Convivências; Kenneth R. Andrews, Elizabethan Privateering: English
Privateering during the Spanish War, ... S. Duplessis, Transitions to Capitalism in
Early Modern Europe (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997), 116, 131.

Author: Stuart B. Schwartz

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 9780807895627

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 185

The idea that sugar, plantations, slavery, and capitalism were all present at the birth of the Atlantic world has long dominated scholarly thinking. In nine original essays by a multinational group of top scholars, Tropical Babylons re-evaluates this so-called "sugar revolution." The most comprehensive comparative study to date of early Atlantic sugar economies, this collection presents a revisionist examination of the origins of society and economy in the Atlantic world. Focusing on areas colonized by Spain and Portugal (before the emergence of the Caribbean sugar colonies of England, France, and Holland), these essays show that despite reliance on common knowledge and technology, there were considerable variations in the way sugar was produced. With studies of Iberia, Madeira and the Canary Islands, Hispaniola, Cuba, Brazil, and Barbados, this volume demonstrates the similarities and differences between the plantation colonies, questions the very idea of a sugar revolution, and shows how the specific conditions in each colony influenced the way sugar was produced and the impact of that crop on the formation of "tropical Babylons--multiracial societies of great oppression. Contributors: Alejandro de la Fuente, University of Pittsburgh Herbert Klein, Columbia University John J. McCusker, Trinity University Russell R. Menard, University of Minnesota William D. Phillips Jr., University of Minnesota Genaro Rodriguez Morel, Seville, Spain Stuart B. Schwartz, Yale University Eddy Stols, Leuven University, Belgium Alberto Vieira, Centro de Estudos Atlanticos, Madeira
Categories: History

Exploring Cultural History

Exploring Cultural History

... 2002), pp. 1-3 1 . Also see Robert S. Duplessis, Transitions of Capitalism in
Early Modern Europe (Cambridge, 1997), pp. 237-8. the rise of the modern state,
it is thus necessary Colbert, Louis XIV and the Golden Notebooks: What ...

Author: Joan Pau Rubiés

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 0754667502

Category: History

Page: 376

View: 631

Melissa Calaresu is the McKendrick Lecturer in History at Gonville and Caius College, University of Cambridge, UK. Filippo de Vivo is Senior Lecturer in Early Modern History at Birkbeck College, University of London, UK. Joan-Pau Rubies is Reader in International History at the London School of Economics and Political Science, UK.
Categories: History

Europe in Transition

Europe in Transition

This book adopts an interpretive approach and tries to explain what led to the dislocation of centuries-old social order and the emergence of new social classes.

Author: Arvind Sinha

Publisher: Manohar Publications

ISBN: 8173048436

Category: History

Page: 782

View: 234

The developments in Europe from the late 15th till the end of the 18th century represented a crucial phase in the emergence of the modern world. Scholars refer to this period as "early modern" and this expression is often associated with the rise of the modern West. The pace of change gained momentum during this period undermining the roots of the feudal society. The economic transformation pushed Europe towards capitalism. The forces of change could be located in the diverse spheres of human activities although the scale of change varied from one region to another. The transformation of local economies into the larger European market economy, the geographical discoveries, and the new sea routes resulted in the creation of colonial empires based on new forms of exploitation. The rise of nation-states under absolute rulers replaced the decentralized feudal structure. Discoveries in arts and sciences and the religious movements opened up new mental horizons that gave birth to new social attitudes, cultural patterns, and scientific outlook. At the same time, the negative trends during this period such as the rise of slave trade, new forms of exploitation, and a wild craze for witch-hunting are also included in the discussion. This book adopts an interpretive approach and tries to explain what led to the dislocation of centuries-old social order and the emergence of new social classes.
Categories: History

The Industrial Revolution

The Industrial Revolution

Robert S . DuPlessis Transitions to Capitalism in Early Modern Europe . . . Both
because food remained the largest category of expenditure in popular budgets ,
and because farming remained far and away Europeans ' single biggest ...

Author: Steven Maurice Beaudoin

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin College Division

ISBN: STANFORD:36105114284032

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 234

View: 912

A volume in the Problems in European Civilization series, this book features a collection of secondary-source essays that focus on various aspects of the Industrial Revolution. This text takes a broad view of industrialization, looking at countries other than England and examining causation back to the 16th century.
Categories: Business & Economics

The Peasants of Ottobeuren 1487 1726

The Peasants of Ottobeuren  1487   1726

Introduction The specter haunting the historiography of early modern Europe is
the specter of transition. ... ́egime, or the transition from feudalism to capitalism.2
Of course, it was always recognized that economic growth was hardly a universal
 ...

Author: Govind P. Sreenivasan

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139454250

Category: History

Page:

View: 305

The Peasants of Ottobeuren offers an interesting perspective on one of the enduring problems of early modern European history: the possibilities for economic growth and social change in rural society. Based on the voluminous records of the Swabian Benedictine monastery of Ottobeuren, this study underscores the limitations of the traditional narrative of a sixteenth-century boom which foundered on the productive rigidities of the peasant economy and then degenerated into social crisis in the seventeenth century. Population growth did strain resources at Ottobeuren, but the peasantry continued to produce substantial agricultural surplus. More importantly, peasants reacted to demographic pressure by deepening their involvement in land and credit markets, and more widely and aggressively marketing the fruits of their labour. Marriage and inheritance underwent a similar process of commercialization which made heavy demands on the peasantry, but which maintained a degree of social stability through the devastations of war, plague and famine.
Categories: History

Cultures of Calvinism in Early Modern Europe

Cultures of Calvinism in Early Modern Europe

Recognizing that Reformed Protestantism developed in a variety of cultural settings, this volume analyzes the ways in which it related to the multi-confessional cultural environment that prevailed in Europe after the Reformation.

Author: Crawford Gribben

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780190456283

Category: Religion

Page: 264

View: 863

Scholars have associated Calvinism with print and literary cultures, with republican, liberal, and participatory political cultures, with cultures of violence and vandalism, enlightened cultures, cultures of social discipline, secular cultures, and with the emergence of capitalism. Reflecting on these arguments, the essays in this volume recognize that Reformed Protestantism did not develop as a uniform tradition but varied across space and time. The authors demonstrate that multiple iterations of Calvinism developed and impacted upon differing European communities that were experiencing social and cultural transition. They show how these different forms of Calvinism were shaped by their adherents and opponents, and by the divergent political and social contexts in which they were articulated and performed. Recognizing that Reformed Protestantism developed in a variety of cultural settings, this volume analyzes the ways in which it related to the multi-confessional cultural environment that prevailed in Europe after the Reformation.
Categories: Religion