The Mind in the Cave

The Mind in the Cave

How did these images spring into the human story? This book, a masterful piece of detective work, puts forward the most plausible explanation yet.

Author: David Lewis-Williams

Publisher: Thames & Hudson

ISBN: 9780500770306

Category: History

Page: 291

View: 405

The art created in the caves of western Europe in the Ice Age provokes awe and wonder. What do these symbols on the walls of Lascaux and Altamira, tell us about the nature of ancestral minds? How did these images spring into the human story? This book, a masterful piece of detective work, puts forward the most plausible explanation yet.
Categories: History

Inside the Neolithic Mind

Inside the Neolithic Mind

This fascinating book continues the story begun in the bestselling and critically acclaimed book The Mind in the Cave.

Author: David Lewis-Williams

Publisher:

ISBN: 0500294410

Category: Civilization, Ancient

Page: 320

View: 339

Now in compact paperback, a compelling examination of how brain structure and cultural context interacted in the Neolithic period, 10,000 years ago, to produce unique patterns in belief systems.
Categories: Civilization, Ancient

Evolution and the Emergent Self

Evolution and the Emergent Self

Ibid., 195; Mithen, “Ethnobiology and the Evolution of the Human Mind,” S51. 6. J.
David Lewis-Williams, The Mind in the Cave: Consciousness and the Origins of
Art (London: Thames and Hudson, 2002). 7. Ibid., 80. 8. F. d'Errico et al., ...

Author: Raymond L. Neubauer

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231521680

Category: Science

Page: 320

View: 777

Evolution and the Emergent Self is an eloquent and evocative new synthesis that explores how the human species emerged from the cosmic dust. Lucidly presenting ideas about the rise of complexity in our genetic, neuronal, ecological, and ultimately cosmological settings, the author takes readers on a provocative tour of modern science's quest to understand our place in nature and in our universe. Readers fascinated with "Big History" and drawn to examine big ideas will be challenged and enthralled by Raymond L. Neubauer's ambitious narrative. How did humans emerge from the cosmos and the pre-biotic Earth, and what mechanisms of biological, chemical, and physical sciences drove this increasingly complex process? Neubauer presents a view of nature that describes the rising complexity of life in terms of increasing information content, first in genes and then in brains. The evolution of the nervous system expanded the capacity of organisms to store information, making learning possible. In key chapters, the author portrays four species with high brain:body ratios—chimpanzees, elephants, ravens, and dolphins—showing how each species shares with humans the capacity for complex communication, elaborate social relationships, flexible behavior, tool use, and powers of abstraction. A large brain can have a hierarchical arrangement of circuits that facilitates higher levels of abstraction. Neubauer describes this constellation of qualities as an emergent self, arguing that self-awareness is nascent in several species besides humans and that potential human characteristics are embedded in the evolutionary process and have emerged repeatedly in a variety of lineages on our planet. He ultimately demonstrates that human culture is not a unique offshoot of a language-specialized primate, but an analogue of fundamental mechanisms that organisms have used since the beginning of life on Earth to gather and process information in order to buffer themselves from fluctuations in the environment. Neubauer also views these developments in a cosmic setting, detailing open thermodynamic systems that grow more complex as the energy flowing through them increases. Similar processes of increasing complexity can be found in the "self-organizing" structures of both living and nonliving forms. Recent evidence from astronomy indicates that planet formation may be nearly as frequent as star formation. Since life makes use of the elements commonly seeded into space by burning and expiring stars, it is reasonable to speculate that the evolution of life and intelligence that happened on our planet may be found across the universe.
Categories: Science

Cave

Cave

... 1967 ) The Mind in the Cave : Consciousness and the Origins of Art by David
LewisWilliams ( Thames & Hudson , 2002 ) The Roots of Civilization : The
Cognitive Beginnings of Man ' s First Art , Symbol and Notation by Alexander
Marshack ...

Author: Richard Lewis

Publisher: Touchstone Center Publicati

ISBN: 1929299036

Category: Art

Page: 56

View: 151

CAVE: An Evocation of the Beginnings of Art by Richard Lewis is a poetic imagining why humans over thirty thousand years ago began to paint on the walls of dark caves astonishing images of animals they hunted and revered. Illustrating the book ar
Categories: Art

The Poems of Browning Volume One

The Poems of Browning  Volume One

Or we will go together, like twin gods Of the infernal world, with scented lamp
Over the dead—to call and to awake— Over the unshaped images which lie 970
Within my mind's cave—only leaving all That tells of the past doubts. So when ...

Author: John Woolford

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317873167

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 840

View: 428

The Poems of Browning is the first collected edition to be based on the earliest printed texts, and to present these texts in order of their composition.Together, volumes I and II provide an authoritative and accessible tribute to this great poet. Volume I, 1826-1840 traces Browning's career up to the writing of Sordello. It includes his only surviving juvenilia: The Dance of Death and The First-Borm of Egypt; Pauline, his first anonymous publication, and Paracelsus, the poem which made his literary reputation.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Perspectives on Human Dignity A Conversation

Perspectives on Human Dignity  A Conversation

Rodney Hall, the Australian writer, wrote a fascinating novel called The Island in
the Mind. He wrote, at one level, about the ... 3 D. Lewis-Williams, The Mind in the
Cave (London: Thames & Hudson, 2002). 4 G. Chaloupka, Journey in Time ...

Author: Jeff Malpas

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9781402062810

Category: Philosophy

Page: 240

View: 928

The idea of human dignity is central to any reflection on the nature of human worth. However, the idea is a complex one that also takes on many different forms. This unique collection explores the idea of human dignity as it arises within these many different domains, opening up the possibility of a multidisciplinary conversation that illuminates the concept itself. The book includes essays by leading Australian and International figures.
Categories: Philosophy

Cultural Neuroscience Cultural Influences on Brain Function

Cultural Neuroscience  Cultural Influences on Brain Function

The mind in the cave: Consciousness and the origins of art. London: Thames &
Hudson ... body and culture conflate. In E. DeMarrais, C. Gosden, & C. Renfrew (
Eds.), Rethinking materiality: The engagement of mind with the material world (pp
.

Author: Juan Y. Chiao

Publisher: Elsevier

ISBN: 9780080952215

Category: Science

Page: 328

View: 806

This volume presents recent empirical advances using neuroscience techniques to investigate how culture influences neural processes underlying a wide range of human abilities, from perception and scene processing to memory and social cognition. It also highlights the theoretical and methodological issues with conducting cultural neuroscience research. Section I provides diverse theoretical perspectives on how culture and biology interact are represented. Sections II –VI is to demonstrate how cultural values, beliefs, practices and experience affect neural systems underlying a wide range of human behavior from perception and cognition to emotion, social cognition and decision-making. The final section presents arguments for integrating the study of culture and the human brain by providing an explicit articulation of how the study of culture can inform the study of the brain and vice versa.
Categories: Science

Shelley s Idols of the Cave

Shelley s Idols of the Cave

COUNTRIES OF THE MIND SHELLEY was usually modest about his own work;
therefore one is the more willing to attend carefully when one finds him, in a letter
to Godwin (n December 1817), claiming a particular merit for himself: 'I am ...

Author:

Publisher: Ardent Media

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 447

Categories:

Austria

Austria

cave . now described . If the latter has all the beauty and delicacy and fantastic
variety of the gothic architecture , the former brings to mind the solemnity and
grandeur of the Egyptian . There was something exceedingly awful in the
impression ...

Author: Peter Evan Turnbull

Publisher:

ISBN: ONB:+Z155318905

Category:

Page:

View: 867

Categories:

I Died for Beauty

I Died for Beauty

Moreover, these designs and mosaics appear, to the hallucinating mind, to be
projected on a ceiling! This might bear some relation to the origins of ornamental
art, Klüver suggested. In The Mind in the Cave, a study of the prehistoric cave art
of ...

Author: Marjorie Senechal

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199910830

Category: Science

Page: 312

View: 339

In the vein of A Beautiful Mind, The Man Who Loved Only Numbers, and Rosalind Franklin: The Dark Lady of DNA, this volume tells the poignant story of the brilliant, colorful, controversial mathematician named Dorothy Wrinch. Drawing on her own personal and professional relationship with Wrinch and archives in the United States, Canada, and England, Marjorie Senechal explores the life and work of this provocative, scintillating mind. Senechal portrays a woman who was learned, restless, imperious, exacting, critical, witty, and kind. A young disciple of Bertrand Russell while at Cambridge, the first women to receive a doctor of science degree from Oxford University, Wrinch's contributions to mathematical physics, philosophy, probability theory, genetics, protein structure, and crystallography were anything but inconsequential. But Wrinch, a complicated and ultimately tragic figure, is remembered today for her much publicized feud with Linus Pauling over the molecular architecture of proteins. Pauling ultimately won that bitter battle. Yet, Senechal reminds us, some of the giants of mid-century science--including Niels Bohr, Irving Langmuir, D'Arcy Thompson, Harold Urey, and David Harker--took Wrinch's side in the feud. What accounts for her vast if now-forgotten influence? What did these renowned thinkers, in such different fields, hope her model might explain? Senechal presents a sympathetic portrait of the life and work of a luminous but tragically flawed character. At the same time, she illuminates the subtler prejudices Wrinch faced as a feisty woman, profound culture clashes between scientific disciplines, ever-changing notions of symmetry and pattern in science, and the puzzling roles of beauty and truth.
Categories: Science

The Oxford Handbook of African Archaeology

The Oxford Handbook of African Archaeology

and YATES, R. (1996). Preliminary results from excavations at Steenbokfontein
Cave: implications for past and future research. ... (2002). The Mind in the Cave:
Consciousness and the Origins of Art. London: Thames & Hudson. ——— (2008).

Author: Peter Mitchell

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191626159

Category: Social Science

Page: 1080

View: 117

Africa has the longest and arguably the most diverse archaeological record of any of the continents. It is where the human lineage first evolved and from where Homo sapiens spread across the rest of the world. Later, it witnessed novel experiments in food-production and unique trajectories to urbanism and the organisation of large communities that were not always structured along strictly hierarchical lines. Millennia of engagement with societies in other parts of the world confirm Africa's active participation in the construction of the modern world, while the richness of its history, ethnography, and linguistics provide unusually powerful opportunities for constructing interdisciplinary narratives of Africa's past. This Handbook provides a comprehensive and up-to-date synthesis of African archaeology, covering the entirety of the continent's past from the beginnings of human evolution to the archaeological legacy of European colonialism. As well as covering almost all periods and regions of the continent, it includes a mixture of key methodological and theoretical issues and debates, and situates the subject's contemporary practice within the discipline's history and the infrastructural challenges now facing its practitioners. Bringing together essays on all these themes from over seventy contributors, many of them living and working in Africa, it offers a highly accessible, contemporary account of the subject for use by scholars and students of not only archaeology, but also history, anthropology, and other disciplines.
Categories: Social Science

Lone Survivors

Lone Survivors

Lewis-Williams, D. The Mind in the Cave: Consciousness and the Origins ofArt.
Thames & Hudson, London, 2002. Lycett, S. J., M. Collard and W. C. McGrew. “
Phylogenetic analyses of behavior support existence of culture among wild ...

Author: Chris Stringer

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9781429973441

Category: Science

Page: 336

View: 270

A leading researcher on human evolution proposes a new and controversial theory of how our species came to be In this groundbreaking and engaging work of science, world-renowned paleoanthropologist Chris Stringer sets out a new theory of humanity's origin, challenging both the multiregionalists (who hold that modern humans developed from ancient ancestors in different parts of the world) and his own "out of Africa" theory, which maintains that humans emerged rapidly in one small part of Africa and then spread to replace all other humans within and outside the continent. Stringer's new theory, based on archeological and genetic evidence, holds that distinct humans coexisted and competed across the African continent—exchanging genes, tools, and behavioral strategies. Stringer draws on analyses of old and new fossils from around the world, DNA studies of Neanderthals (using the full genome map) and other species, and recent archeological digs to unveil his new theory. He shows how the most sensational recent fossil findings fit with his model, and he questions previous concepts (including his own) of modernity and how it evolved. Lone Survivors will be the definitive account of who and what we were, and will change perceptions about our origins and about what it means to be human.
Categories: Science

The Ancestor s Tale

The Ancestor s Tale

... our extraplanetary observer's uniformitarian view would stand up to much
searching analysis, but it could be at least briefly defended. David Lewis-
Williams's The Mind in the Cave considers the whole question of Upper
Palaeolithic cave art, ...

Author: Richard Dawkins

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0618005838

Category: Science

Page: 673

View: 489

A renowned biologist provides a sweeping chronicle of more than four billion years of life on Earth, shedding new light on evolutionary theory and history, sexual selection, speciation, extinction, genetics, and geographical dispersal.
Categories: Science

Supersense

Supersense

DAVID LEWISWILLIAMS , The Mind in the Cave (2004), p. 18 WHO TEACHES
US about the 'something there'? When do we start thinking that there is a hidden
but real dimension to reality? Is itreligion, or does religion simply recognize and ...

Author: Bruce Hood

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9781849012461

Category: Science

Page: 160

View: 630

Why is it that Tony Blair always wore the same pair of shoes when answering Prime Minister's Questions? That John McEnroe notoriously refused to step on the white lines of a tennis court between points? And that President-elect Barack Obama played a game of basketball the morning of his victory in the Iowa primary, and continued the tradition the day of every following primary? Superstitious habits are common. Do you ever cross your fingers, knock on wood, avoid walking under ladders, or step around black cats? Sentimental value often supersedes material worth. If someone offered to replace your childhood teddy bear or wedding ring with a brand new, exact replica, would you do it? How about £20 for trying on a jumper owned by Fred West? Where do such feelings come from and why do most of us have them? Humans are born with brains designed to make sense of the world and that need for an explanation can lead to beliefs that go beyond reason. To be true they would have to be supernatural. With scientific education we learn that such beliefs are irrational but at an intuitive level they can be resistant to reason or lie dormant in otherwise sensible adults. It now seems unlikely that any effort to get rid of supernatural beliefs or superstitious behaviours will be completely successful. This is not all bad news - such beliefs are a useful glue that binds us together as a society. Combining brilliant insight with witty example Hood weaves a page-turning account of our 'supersense' that navigates a path through brain science, child development, popular culture, mental illness and the paranormal. After reading SuperSense, you will realize why you are not as reasonable as you might like to think - and why that might be no bad thing.
Categories: Science

The Freudian Labyrinth

The Freudian Labyrinth

The grand myth of Crete's labyrinth is important to keep in mind. In the cave
dwells the Minotaur, the human with a bull's head, who kills all who venture into
his maze. Theseus enters the cave with a magic sword (psychoanalysis) while ...

Author: Frank Reinhardt Morris

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 9781435714786

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 152

View: 423

A psychotherapeutic journey from boyhood to adulthood. The author sifted through a century of Freudian theory and in this book through self-examination, explains specifically how those theories can be used for an individual's liberation. Beginning with personal conflicts, the reader is led through a maze of identity formation and into the achievement of true intimacy.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Horse Nations

Horse Nations

Believing and Seeing: Symbolic Meaning in Southern San Rock Art. London:
Academic Press. LewisWilliams, J. D. (2002). The Mind in the Cave. London:
Thames & Hudson. LewisWilliams, J. D. and Dowson, T. A. (1999). Images of
Power.

Author: Peter Mitchell

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191008825

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 549

The Native American on a horse is an archetypal Hollywood image, but though such equestrian-focused societies were a relatively short-lived consequence of European expansion overseas, they were not restricted to North America's Plains. Horse Nations provides the first wide-ranging and up-to-date synthesis of the impact of the horse on the Indigenous societies of North and South America, southern Africa, and Australasia following its introduction as a result of European contact post-1492. Drawing on sources in a variety of languages and on the evidence of archaeology, anthropology, and history, the volume outlines the transformations that the acquisition of the horse wrought on a diverse range of groups within these four continents. It explores key topics such as changes in subsistence, technology, and belief systems, the horse's role in facilitating the emergence of more hierarchical social formations, and the interplay between ecology, climate, and human action in adopting the horse, as well as considering how far equestrian lifestyles were ultimately unsustainable.
Categories: History

The Cave and the Butterfly

The Cave and the Butterfly

Taking a step further than Zhu Xi, however, Wang identifies the heavenly
Principle with the mind in itself, which is the original, pure, and morally perfect
mind. The mind is co-extensive with the universe, constituting the life horizon of
human ...

Author: Paul S. Chung

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781606085301

Category: Religion

Page: 316

View: 370

This study offers an intercultural theory of interpretation and religion. It does so by bringing Western and East Asian traditions into dialogue regarding the nature of interpretation. The result of this innovative study is a theory of interpretation which integrates the socially embodied dimension of human life with the study of hermeneutics and religion in post-foundational and cross-cultural perspective. Toward this end, Paul Chung offers a constructive theology of divine speech-acts in a manner more amenable to the social-public sphere than other proposals. In all of this he deeply considers intercultural horizon of interpretation between West and East and its implications for a theology of interpretation. The result is a truly theological theory of interpretation that takes seriously the issues of intercultural studies and their intersection with Christian doctrine.
Categories: Religion

The Complete Poetry of Percy Bysshe Shelley

The Complete Poetry of Percy Bysshe Shelley

Cythna seems to have unearthed the secrets buried in the cave of the mind” (37).
Abbey also proposes an important contrast between the epistemology of this
stanza and that of Mont Blanc: “if 'Mont Blanc' makes the mind the channel for the
 ...

Author: Percy Bysshe Shelley

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9781421411095

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 1152

View: 841

"His name is Percy Bysshe Shelley, and he is the author of a poetical work entitled Alastor, or the Spirit of Solitude." With these words, the radical journalist and poet Leigh Hunt announced his discovery in 1816 of an extraordinary talent within "a new school of poetry rising of late." The third volume of the acclaimed edition of The Complete Poetry of Percy Bysshe Shelley includes Alastor, one of Shelley’s first major works, and all the poems that Shelley completed, for either private circulation or publication, during the turbulent years from 1814 to March 1818: Hymn to Intellectual Beauty, Mont Blanc, Laon and Cythna, as well as shorter pieces, such as his most famous sonnet, Ozymandias. It was during these years that Shelley, already an accomplished and practiced poet with three volumes of published verse, authored two major volumes, earned international recognition, and became part of the circle that was later called the Younger Romantics. As with previous volumes, extensive discussions of the poems’ composition, influences, publication, circulation, reception, and critical history accompany detailed records of textual variants for each work. Among the appendixes are Mary W. Shelley’s 1839 notes on the poems for these years, a table of the forty-two revisions made to Laon and Cythna for its reissue as The Revolt of Islam, and Shelley’s errata list for the same. It is in the works included in this volume that the recognizable and characteristic voice of Shelley emerges—unmistakable, consistent, and vital.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Darwin s Pious Idea

Darwin s Pious Idea

365 Thus it is never simply a case of the cave in the mind , as it is for sociobiology
and evolutionary psychology . It is also the mind in the cave . 366 Mind in the
Cave The order of nature becomes the nature of order . Peter Munz367 In Plato's
 ...

Author: Conor Cunningham

Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company

ISBN: IND:30000127716821

Category: Religion

Page: 543

View: 227

According to British scholar Conor Cunningham, the debate today between religion and evolution has been hijacked by extremists: on one side stand fundamentalist believers who reject evolution outright; on the opposing side are fundamentalist atheists who claim that Darwin s theory rules out the possibility of God. Both sides are dead wrong, argues Cunningham, who is at once a Christian and a firm believer in the theory of evolution. In Darwin s Pious Idea Cunningham puts forth a trenchant, compelling case for both creation and evolution, drawing skillfully on an array of philosophical, theological, historical, and scientific sources to buttress his arguments.
Categories: Religion

Landscape of the Mind

Landscape of the Mind

See also Middle Stone Age, in Africa; modernity Boden, Margaret, 8. See also
creativity Bodo (Ethiopia), 81 Boëda, Eric, 89–90. See also Levallois prepared-
core technology Bone Cave (Tasmania), 207n.41 Bonn-Oberkassel (Germany),
132.

Author: John F. Hoffecker

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231518482

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 646

In Landscape of the Mind, John F. Hoffecker explores the origin and growth of the human mind, drawing on archaeology, history, and the fossil record. He suggests that, as an indirect result of bipedal locomotion, early humans developed a feedback relationship among their hands, brains, and tools that evolved into the capacity to externalize thoughts in the form of shaped stone objects. When anatomically modern humans evolved a parallel capacity to externalize thoughts as symbolic language, individual brains within social groups became integrated into a "neocortical Internet," or super-brain, giving birth to the mind. Noting that archaeological traces of symbolism coincide with evidence of the ability to generate novel technology, Hoffecker contends that human creativity, as well as higher order consciousness, is a product of the superbrain. He equates the subsequent growth of the mind with human history, which began in Africa more than 50,000 years ago. As anatomically modern humans spread across the globe, adapting to a variety of climates and habitats, they redesigned themselves technologically and created alternative realities through tools, language, and art. Hoffecker connects the rise of civilization to a hierarchical reorganization of the super-brain, triggered by explosive population growth. Subsequent human history reflects to varying degrees the suppression of the mind's creative powers by the rigid hierarchies of nationstates and empires, constraining the further accumulation of knowledge. The modern world emerged after 1200 from the fragments of the Roman Empire, whose collapse had eliminated a central authority that could thwart innovation. Hoffecker concludes with speculation about the possibility of artificial intelligence and the consequences of a mind liberated from its organic antecedents to exist in an independent, nonbiological form.
Categories: Social Science