Rural Settlement in Hellenistic and Roman Crete

The Akrotiri Peninsula

Rural Settlement in Hellenistic and Roman Crete

Author: Holly Alane Raab

Publisher: British Archaeological Reports Limited

ISBN: N.A

Page: 253

View: 4410

In this study of rural development under Roman rule Raab argues that pre-existing conditions were of major importance. Through the results of regional survey she looks at settlement patterns, land use, production activities and land tenure, focusing largely on the Akrotiri peninsula.
Categories: Social Science

Ancient Crete: Oxford Bibliographies Online Research Guide

Ancient Crete: Oxford Bibliographies Online Research Guide

Author: Oxford University Press

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780199802838

Page: 76

View: 3379

This ebook is a selective guide designed to help scholars and students of the ancient world find reliable sources of information by directing them to the best available scholarly materials in whatever form or format they appear from books, chapters, and journal articles to online archives, electronic data sets, and blogs. Written by a leading international authority on the subject, the ebook provides bibliographic information supported by direct recommendations about which sources to consult and editorial commentary to make it clear how the cited sources are interrelated. A reader will discover, for instance, the most reliable introductions and overviews to the topic, and the most important publications on various areas of scholarly interest within this topic. In classics, as in other disciplines, researchers at all levels are drowning in potentially useful scholarly information, and this guide has been created as a tool for cutting through that material to find the exact source you need. This ebook is just one of many articles from Oxford Bibliographies Online: Classics, a continuously updated and growing online resource designed to provide authoritative guidance through the scholarship and other materials relevant to the study of classics. Oxford Bibliographies Online covers most subject disciplines within the social science and humanities, for more information visit www.aboutobo.com.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Roman Crete: New Perspectives

Roman Crete: New Perspectives

Author: Jane E. Francis,Anna Kouremenos

Publisher: Oxbow Books

ISBN: 1785700960

Page: 288

View: 5818

The last several decades have seen a dramatic increase in interest in the Roman period on the island of Crete. Ongoing and some long-standing excavations and investigations of Roman sites and buildings, intensive archaeological survey of Roman areas, and intensive research on artifacts, history, and inscriptions of the island now provide abundant data for assessing Crete alongside other Roman provinces. New research has also meant a reevaluation of old data in light of new discoveries, and the history and archaeology of Crete is now being rewritten. The breadth of topics addressed by the papers in this volume is an indication of Crete’s vast archaeological potential for contributing to current academic issues such as Romanization/acculturation, climate and landscape studies, regional production and distribution, iconographic trends, domestic housing, economy and trade, and the transition to the late-Antique era. These papers confirm Crete’s place as a fully realized participant in the Roman world over the course of many centuries but also position it as a newly discovered source of academic inquiry.
Categories: History

Insularity and identity in the Roman Mediterranean

Insularity and identity in the Roman Mediterranean

Author: Anna Kouremenos

Publisher:

ISBN: 1785705830

Page: 208

View: 3907

Insularity – the state or condition of being an island – has played a key role in shaping the identities of populations inhabiting islands of the Mediterranean. As entities surrounded by water and usually possessing different landscapes and ecosystems from those of the mainland, islands allow for the potential to study both the land and the sea. Archaeologically, they have the potential to reveal distinct identities shaped by such forces as invasion, imperialism, colonialism, and connectivity. The theme of insularity and identity in the Roman period has not been the subject of a book length study but has been prevalent in scholarship dealing with the prehistoric periods. The papers in this book explore the concepts of insularity and identity in the Roman period by addressing some of the following questions: what does it mean to be an island? How has insularity shaped ethnic, cultural, and social identity in the Mediterranean during the Roman period? How were islands connected to the mainland and other islands? Did insularity produce isolation or did the populations of Mediterranean islands integrate easily into a common ‘Roman’ culture? How has maritime interaction shaped the economy and culture of specific islands? Can we argue for distinct ‘island identities’ during the Roman period? The twelve papers presented here each deal with specific islands or island groups, thus allowing for an integrated view of Mediterranean insularity and identity.
Categories: Social Science

The Mosaics of Roman Crete

Art, Archaeology and Social Change

The Mosaics of Roman Crete

Author: Rebecca J. Sweetman

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107018404

Page: 378

View: 9712

This book examines the rich corpus of mosaics created in Crete during the Roman and Late Antique eras. It provides essential information on the style, iconography, and chronology of the material, as well as discussion of the craftspeople who created them and the technologies they used. The contextualized mosaic evidence also reveals a new understanding of Roman and Late Antique Crete. It helps shed light on the processes by which Crete became part of the Roman Empire, its subsequent Christianization, and the pivotal role the island played in the Mediterranean network of societies during these periods. This book provides an original approach to the study of mosaics and an innovative method of presenting a diachronic view of provincial Cretan society.
Categories: Art

Beyond the Site

Regional Studies in the Aegean Area

Beyond the Site

Author: Society for the Anthropology of Europe (U.S.)

Publisher: University Press of Amer

ISBN: N.A

Page: 417

View: 4475

Categories: History

Byzantine Crete

From the 5th Century to the Venetian Conquest

Byzantine Crete

Author: Dēmētrēs Tsounkarakēs,Dimitris Tsougarakis

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Page: 462

View: 4690

Categories: Crete (Greece)

The Other Greeks

The Family Farm and the Agrarian Roots of Western Civilization

The Other Greeks

Author: Victor Davis Hanson

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520209350

Page: 566

View: 5933

Victor Hanson shows that the "Greek revolution" was not the rise of a free and democratic urban culture, but rather the historic innovation of the independent family farm."--BOOK JACKET.
Categories: History

Excavations at Sabratha, 1948-1951

A Report on the Excavations Conducted by Dame Kathleen Kenyon and John Ward-Perkins

Excavations at Sabratha, 1948-1951

Author: Philip M. Kenrick

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Page: 320

View: 2702

Categories: Architecture, Byzantine

Approaches to Archaeological Ceramics

Approaches to Archaeological Ceramics

Author: Carla M. Sinopoli

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9780306435751

Page: 238

View: 7431

More than any other category of evidence, ceramics ofters archaeologists their most abundant and potentially enlightening source of information on the past. Being made primarily of day, a relatively inexpensive material that is available in every region, ceramics became essential in virtually every society in the world during the past ten thousand years. The straightfor ward technology of preparing, forming, and firing day into hard, durable shapes has meant that societies at various levels of complexity have come to rely on it for a wide variety of tasks. Ceramic vessels quickly became essential for many household and productive tasks. Food preparation, cooking, and storage-the very basis of settled village life-could not exist as we know them without the use of ceramic vessels. Often these vessels broke into pieces, but the virtually indestructible quality of the ceramic material itself meant that these pieces would be preserved for centuries, waiting to be recovered by modem archaeologists. The ability to create ceramic material with diverse physical properties, to form vessels into so many different shapes, and to decorate them in limitless manners, led to their use in far more than utilitarian contexts. Some vessels were especially made to be used in trade, manufacturing activities, or rituals, while ceramic material was also used to make other items such as figurines, models, and architectural ornaments.
Categories: Social Science