Embracing Democracy in Modern Germany

Political Citizenship and Participation, 1871-2000

Embracing Democracy in Modern Germany

Author: Michael L. Hughes

Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic

ISBN: 9781350153752

Page: 304

View: 7675

Over the course of the modern era, the traditional stereotype of authoritarian Germans has given way as they have become (mostly) model democrats. This book examines 130 years of history to comprehensively address the central questions relating to this for the first time: How and why did this process occur? What has democracy meant to various Germans? And, finally, how stable is their, or indeed anyone's, democracy? Looking at six German regimes across twelve decades, this study allows you to see how and why Germans have chosen to be politically active (even under dictatorships), the enormous range of conceptions of political culture and democracy they have held; and how the interactions between these factors produced instability and stability at different times. Michael L. Hughes also makes clear that recent surges of support for 'populism' and 'authoritarianism' have not come out of nowhere, but are inherent in long-standing contestations about democracy and political citizenship. Hughes argues that democracy – in Germany or elsewhere – is not a happy ending story of adversity overcome; it is an ongoing, open-ended process whose ultimate outcome remains uncertain.
Categories: History

Modern Germany in Transatlantic Perspective

Modern Germany in Transatlantic Perspective

Author: Michael Meng,Adam R. Seipp

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 178533705X

Page: 320

View: 6311

Bringing together incisive contributions from an international group of colleagues and former students, Modern Germany in Transatlantic Perspective takes stock of the field of German history as exemplified by the extraordinary scholarly career of Konrad H. Jarausch. Through fascinating reflections on the discipline’s theoretical, professional, and methodological dimensions, it explores Jarausch’s monumental work as a teacher and a builder of scholarly institutions. In this way, it provides not merely a look back at the last fifty years of German history, but a path forward as new ideas and methods infuse the study of Germany’s past.
Categories: History

Stranger in My Own Country

A Jewish Family in Modern Germany

Stranger in My Own Country

Author: Yascha Mounk

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 1429953780

Page: 272

View: 1200

A moving and unsettling exploration of a young man's formative years in a country still struggling with its past As a Jew in postwar Germany, Yascha Mounk felt like a foreigner in his own country. When he mentioned that he is Jewish, some made anti-Semitic jokes or talked about the superiority of the Aryan race. Others, sincerely hoping to atone for the country's past, fawned over him with a forced friendliness he found just as alienating. Vivid and fascinating, Stranger in My Own Country traces the contours of Jewish life in a country still struggling with the legacy of the Third Reich and portrays those who, inevitably, continue to live in its shadow. Marshaling an extraordinary range of material into a lively narrative, Mounk surveys his countrymen's responses to "the Jewish question." Examining history, the story of his family, and his own childhood, he shows that anti-Semitism and far-right extremism have long coexisted with self-conscious philo-Semitism in postwar Germany. But of late a new kind of resentment against Jews has come out in the open. Unnoticed by much of the outside world, the desire for a "finish line" that would spell a definitive end to the country's obsession with the past is feeding an emphasis on German victimhood. Mounk shows how, from the government's pursuit of a less "apologetic" foreign policy to the way the country's idea of the Volk makes life difficult for its immigrant communities, a troubled nationalism is shaping Germany's future.
Categories: History

Former Leaders in Modern Democracies

Political Sunsets

Former Leaders in Modern Democracies

Author: K. Theakston,J. de Vries,Jouke de Vries

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137265310

Page: 254

View: 4894

What comes next for a former leader in a democracy - a Prime Minister or President obliged to leave office because they have lost an election, come to the end of their constitutionally-fixed term, lost the backing of their party, or chosen to leave? This book analyses the role and political influence of former leaders in Western democratic states.
Categories: Political Science

Access to History: Democracy and Dictatorship in Germany 1919-63

Access to History: Democracy and Dictatorship in Germany 1919-63

Author: Geoff Layton

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 1444150502

Page: 400

View: 1560

The Access to History series is the most popular and trusted series for AS and A level history students. Beginning in 1918 with the German Revolution, this title charts the course of German history over this period, and the changing nature of democracy and dicatorship. It goes on to explore the emergence of the Weimar Republic with its inherent weaknesses and the subsequent rise of the Nazis. Nazi society, economy and political structures are examined thoroughly. The book then goes on to consider the course of German society to 1963, considering the consequences of the Second World War, the creation of two Germanys and the changes that took place throughout. Key dates, terms and issues are highlighted, and historical interpretations of key debates are outlined. Summary diagrams are included to consolidate knowledge and understanding of the period, and exam-style questions and tips written by an examiner provide the opportunity to develop exam skills.
Categories: Education

The Weimar Century

German Émigrés and the Ideological Foundations of the Cold War

The Weimar Century

Author: Udi Greenberg

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691173826

Page: 276

View: 8582

How ideas, individuals, and political traditions from Weimar Germany molded the global postwar order The Weimar Century reveals the origins of two dramatic events: Germany's post–World War II transformation from a racist dictatorship to a liberal democracy, and the ideological genesis of the Cold War. Blending intellectual, political, and international histories, Udi Greenberg shows that the foundations of Germany’s reconstruction lay in the country’s first democratic experiment, the Weimar Republic (1918–33). He traces the paths of five crucial German émigrés who participated in Weimar’s intense political debates, spent the Nazi era in the United States, and then rebuilt Europe after a devastating war. Examining the unexpected stories of these diverse individuals—Protestant political thinker Carl J. Friedrich, Socialist theorist Ernst Fraenkel, Catholic publicist Waldemar Gurian, liberal lawyer Karl Loewenstein, and international relations theorist Hans Morgenthau—Greenberg uncovers the intellectual and political forces that forged Germany’s democracy after dictatorship, war, and occupation. In restructuring German thought and politics, these émigrés also shaped the currents of the early Cold War. Having borne witness to Weimar’s political clashes and violent upheavals, they called on democratic regimes to permanently mobilize their citizens and resources in global struggle against their Communist enemies. In the process, they gained entry to the highest levels of American power, serving as top-level advisors to American occupation authorities in Germany and Korea, consultants for the State Department in Latin America, and leaders in universities and philanthropic foundations across Europe and the United States. Their ideas became integral to American global hegemony. From interwar Germany to the dawn of the American century, The Weimar Century sheds light on the crucial ideas, individuals, and politics that made the trans-Atlantic postwar order.
Categories: History

The Origins of Christian Democracy

Politics and Confession in Modern Germany

The Origins of Christian Democracy

Author: Maria Mitchell

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 0472118412

Page: 343

View: 3194

A pioneering exploration of the origins of German Christian Democracy in the context of 19th- and 20th-century politics and religion
Categories: History

In the Embrace of the Swan

Anglo-German Mythologies in Literature, the Visual Arts and Cultural Theory

In the Embrace of the Swan

Author: Rüdiger Görner,Angus Nicholls

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN: 3110215918

Page: 404

View: 3678

Myths determine the way cultures understand themselves. The papers in this volume examine culturally specific myths in Britain and the German-speaking world, and compare approaches to the theory of myth, together with the ways in which mythological formations operate in literature, aesthetics and politics ‑ with a focus on the period around 1800. They enquire into the consequences of myth-oriented discourses for the way in which these two cultures understand each other, and in this way make a significant contribution to a more profound approach to intercultural research.
Categories: Literary Criticism

American Government and Politics: Deliberation, Democracy, and Citizenship - No Separate Policy Chapters

American Government and Politics: Deliberation, Democracy, and Citizenship - No Separate Policy Chapters

Author: Joseph M. Bessette,John J. Pitney

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN: 1285624831

Page: 640

View: 3487

Bessette/Pitney's AMERICAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS: DELIBERATION, DEMOCRACY, AND CITIZENSHIP is based on the idea of deliberative democracy: political systems work best when informed citizens and public officials deliberate to identify and promote the common good. Emphasizing citizenship, the text examines the way that civic culture and immigration impact students and shape the country. It offers solid historical coverage and a close look at civic responsibility. This version of the text does not include policy chapters. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.
Categories: Education

Constitutional Democracy in a Multicultural and Globalised World

Constitutional Democracy in a Multicultural and Globalised World

Author: Thomas Fleiner,Lidija Basta Fleiner

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 3540764127

Page: 670

View: 3836

After World War II, states transformed into ‘collective fortresses’ in order to protect competing ideological systems. The debate on post-modern statehood heavily built on ideological disputes between liberalism and communism, over the nature of the economic and social system, and the state and government that could sustain such a system. What is an ‘ideologically acceptable’ state-concept; which tasks and fu- tions should the state fulfil, and how to legitimate not only democratic, but also authoritarian and even totalitarian regimes? These questions were at the very centre of state theory. However, after the fall of communism in Europe and the former Soviet Union, the discourse of state and government scholarship radically changed. The need for a profound shift in the state paradigm was emerging. The time after 1989 seemed to proclaim that the nation-state had lost its raison d’être as an island of undisputed and unlimited sovereignty. A globalised world order broke open the ‘fortress state’ that developed within the tradition of European constitutionalism. Given the simultaneous structural changes to the nation-state’s foundations, socio-economic and political reforms going hand in hand with new constitutional designs, the ‘state in transition’ started paving the way towards a new state paradigm, and not only with regard to the states in the process of de- cratic transformation from socialist into liberal constitutional democracies.
Categories: Political Science