Around Greensboro

Around Greensboro

The quaint town of Greensboro, Maryland, is nestled in the middle of the Delmarva Peninsula on Maryland's Eastern Shore where its American roots travel across the Choptank River and reach deep into the agricultural soil of Caroline County.

Author: Judy Reveal

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 0738553727

Category: History

Page: 127

View: 956

The quaint town of Greensboro, Maryland, is nestled in the middle of the Delmarva Peninsula on Maryland's Eastern Shore where its American roots travel across the Choptank River and reach deep into the agricultural soil of Caroline County. The Choptank River's path meanders up the peninsula from the Chesapeake Bay, cutting through Caroline County, and it is at the great bend in the river that Peter Harrington brought into full bloom his grandfather Peter Rich's vision of a town. This location was vital to the movement of products to and from people living in the middle of the peninsula, and Greensboro quickly grew into a thriving small port town where businesses, including tanneries and shipbuilding, appeared. Greensboro's accessibility to Washington, Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Wilmington makes this quiet town a convenient bedroom community with big-town access and rural serenity.
Categories: History

Around Greensboro

Around Greensboro

Looking at it now, one would not be able to tell that at one time this sleepy little
town was a bustling and important industrial town that would help shape the area
around it. At one time, it was predicted that Greensboro would grow to reach the ...

Author: Michele Buday-Murray

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9781439649077

Category: Photography

Page: 128

View: 183

Around Greensboro covers communities of southeastern Greene County, including Greensboro at its heart. Greensboro was originally called Delight by the Mingo Indians who lived in the region. Because of its location on the Monongahela River, it quickly became an important trading location for the trappers and settlers moving through in the late 1700s. Later, Albert Gallatin introduced a group of Belgian glassblowers to the area, and in 1807, the glassworks in Greensboro was opened. As the glass business began to fade, another took its place. The area was rich in clay, which would be vital to the development of the pottery industry. From the 1840s to 1915, pottery was king in Greensboro, and the town boomed. As the pottery industry faded, it too would be replaced by another industry: coal. Greensboro, once famous for its glass and pottery, became known for its bituminous coal mines. This book covers the early days of Greensboro to the devastating Election Day Flood of 1985.
Categories: Photography

Greensboro Volume II Neighborhoods

Greensboro Volume II Neighborhoods

An area known as " West End ” developed around the school , and it soon
included more than 100 houses , five stores , and three churches . This area and
an earlier one around Greensboro College now make up the College Hill Historic
 ...

Author: Gayle Hicks Fripp

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 0738568821

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 639

With 230 more intriguing scenes from Greensboro's past, Greensboro Volume II: Neighborhoods highlights the changing architecture of area homes, churches, and schools, and invites readers to meet the residents who have contributed to the community's growth. The images in this collection, many of which are previously unpublished, have been selected from the extensive archives of the Greensboro Historical Museum. Join author Gayle Hicks Fripp on a fascinating photographic tour that continues to explore the city's impressive transformation. Discover unique 19th-century homes such as Blandwood, Gov. John Motley Morehead's estate; learn about African-American churches established at the end of the Civil War; and witness the impact of transportation developments on the city's expansion and housing patterns. The residences of well-known citizens, including textile entrepreneurs Ceasar Cone and Emanuel Sternberger, World War II flyers George Preddy and Mary Webb Nicholson, and developer A.M. Scales, are also featured.
Categories: History

The Confederate Surrender at Greensboro

The Confederate Surrender at Greensboro

... unit was camped near Bloomington, in northern Randolph County.67 In
Parker's Battery (SC), camped near Greensboro, ... Oftheir stacking of arms, he
said, “a mere squad of noble and brave men, gathered around the tattered flag
that they ...

Author: Robert M. Dunkerly

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9781476603810

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 433

Drawing upon more than 200 eyewitness accounts, this work chronicles the largest troop surrender of the Civil War, at Greensboro—one of the most confusing, frustrating and tension-filled events of the war. Long overshadowed by Appomattox, this event was equally important in ending the war, and is much more representative of how most Americans in 1865 experienced the conflict’s end. The book includes a timeline, organizational charts, an order of battle, maps, and illustrations. It also uses many unpublished accounts and provides information on Confederate campsites that have been lost to development and neglect.
Categories: History

Greensboro s First Presbyterian Church Cemetery

Greensboro s First Presbyterian Church Cemetery

... Robert G. Lindsay , gives insight into daily home life in early Greensboro . “ I
wonder , Dear husband , how you are just now engaged and just look into your
house and see how lonesome wife looks sitting in her gown , a cape thrown
around ...

Author: Carol Moore

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 0738543101

Category: History

Page: 127

View: 780

Historic First Presbyterian Church Cemetery was established in 1831 and over time has survived vandalism, storms, an earthquake, and threats of removal. It is a lasting remembrance to the early citizens of Greensboro who carved a city out of the wilderness. Originally the cemetery was located on the edge of town, but because of Greensboro's growth, it is now nestled in the center of the cultural district behind the Greensboro Historical Museum. Those buried in the cemetery are from all walks of life-from wealthy to poor, those with doctorate degrees to the illiterate, the famous to those whose names are lost for all time, the newborn to the centenarian, the saint to the sinner, and the slave owner to the abolitionist. The early builders of the city and state and veterans of four wars now rest in the First Presbyterian Church Cemetery.
Categories: History

The Athens Georgia Story Moving to Greensboro

The Athens  Georgia Story  Moving to Greensboro

Tricia was a good person when she wasn't Splashing or running around. I don't
know how she died. I hope she had made peace with the Lord so her body can
go to heaven. She died this morning around ten o'clock. We are going to miss
Miss ...

Author: Joshua Jones, Jr.

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 9781300591825

Category:

Page:

View: 709

Categories:

Dateline Greensboro

Dateline Greensboro

The Southern Real Estate Company purchased the Cobb property and started
developing it around 1924, building a golf ... Like the hundreds of weddings they
shot over the years, the entire photo event at Greensboro College lasted close to
 ...

Author: J. Stephen Catlett

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 0738514772

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 294

Martin's Studio photographers Carol W. Martin and Malcolm A. Miller practiced assignment photography for most of their careers. Unlike freelance documentary photographers, they did not choose the times, places, or subjects. However, instead of working at careers that could have easily become tedious and uninteresting, these former newspaper and studio photographers created a vast and amazing body of work, shooting almost every imaginable aspect of community life. Martin and Miller focused their work on Greensboro and Guilford County, but phone calls and appointments took them to all areas of the state. Included in this book are images from Greensboro, as well as Candor, Cape Hatteras, Chapel Hill, Charlotte, Lexington, Manteo, Ocean Isle, Raleigh, Reidsville, and Winston-Salem. Images from the Martin's Studio Collection were first published in Martin's and Miller's Greensboro, also by Catlett, which was created as a companion to the Greensboro Historical Museum's exhibit, which will remain on display through the autumn of 2003. Dateline Greensboro: The Piedmont and Beyond includes entirely different historical images from the archive, and unlike the thematic arrangement for the earlier book, this volume takes readers on a chronological journey-a camera ride-from the 1930s through the 1960s. Three chapters offer readers the opportunity to relive three complete days in the life of the studio, with a timeline of images made from early morning to late night.
Categories: History

History of Greensboro Alabama from Its Earliest Settlement

History of Greensboro  Alabama from Its Earliest Settlement

The next year – 1817 a number of others took up their abode in and around the
present corporate limits of the town ... In these early times the country in and
around Greensboro was an unbroken forest of primeval oaks , hickory , chestnut
and ...

Author: William Edward Wadsworth Yerby

Publisher:

ISBN: CHI:20274993

Category: Greensboro (Ala.)

Page: 200

View: 700

Categories: Greensboro (Ala.)

Klansville U S A

Klansville  U S A

highlights how features of communities beyond their degree of urbanization
shaped the klan's successes and failures.19 Greensboro and its surrounding
Guilford County communities were known as traditional klan hotbeds. Three U.S.
Klan ...

Author: David Cunningham

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199911080

Category: Social Science

Page: 360

View: 733

In the 1960s, on the heels of the Brown vs. Board of Education decision and in the midst of the growing Civil Rights Movement, Ku Klux Klan activity boomed, reaching an intensity not seen since the 1920s, when the KKK boasted over 4 million members. Most surprisingly, the state with the largest Klan membership-more than the rest of the South combined-was North Carolina, a supposed bastion of southern-style progressivism. Klansville, U.S.A. is the first substantial history of the civil rights-era KKK's astounding rise and fall, focusing on the under-explored case of the United Klans of America (UKA) in North Carolina. Why the UKA flourished in the Tar Heel state presents a fascinating puzzle and a window into the complex appeal of the Klan as a whole. Drawing on a range of new archival sources and interviews with Klan members, including state and national leaders, the book uncovers the complex logic of KKK activity. David Cunningham demonstrates that the Klan organized most successfully where whites perceived civil rights reforms to be a significant threat to their status, where mainstream outlets for segregationist resistance were lacking, and where the policing of the Klan's activities was lax. Moreover, by connecting the Klan to the more mainstream segregationist and anti-communist groups across the South, Cunningham provides valuable insight into southern conservatism, its resistance to civil rights, and the region's subsequent dramatic shift to the Republican Party. Klansville, U.S.A. illuminates a period of Klan history that has been largely ignored, shedding new light on organized racism and on how political extremism can intersect with mainstream institutions and ideals.
Categories: Social Science

Greensboro

Greensboro

Greensboro has been hit hard by the changing world economy. The difference in
wages paid in the United States ... Some companies are still around but are
operated by folks outside of Greensboro. And many others are simply gone.
Missing ...

Author: Kevin Reid

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9781439646281

Category: History

Page: 96

View: 323

Greensboro has reinvented itself in recent decades. By the time of its 1958 sesquicentennial, Greensboro was North Carolina's second-largest city and the world's largest producer of denim. It was home to many textile companies, including the world's largest; major insurance firms; and manufacturers of other products. Greensboro holds an important place in the civil rights movement, with the sit-ins at Woolworth's department store, a site now preserved as the International Civil Rights Center & Museum. In 1982, a grocery store opened in Greensboro that wanted to bring the old-fashioned market experience back to consumers. The Fresh Market has since expanded to over 100 stores in more than 20 states. Greensboro's roster of colleges and universities has grown over the years, and it remains a key education and research center. Founded in 1991, RF Micro Devices, Greensboro's largest company, makes components of most cell phones. Greensboro showcases the rich commercial and community history of this city over the past 50 years.
Categories: History

The Greensboro Review

The Greensboro Review

The little explosions of sunlight around the room cheered me up . The windows ...
They were a constant sound in our lives , going round and round and round like
the earth goes around the sun and the moon around the earth . These were ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UCSD:31822041750019

Category: American literature

Page:

View: 203

Categories: American literature

The ESC Quarterly

The ESC Quarterly

Thompson - Arthur is now engaged in construction of Routes 501 and 15
between Chapel Hill and Durham ; has extensive work under contract in
Greensboro and High Point and is resurfacing highways in and around South
Boston , Va .

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015080060448

Category: North Carolina

Page:

View: 430

Categories: North Carolina

Writing Reconstruction

Writing Reconstruction

Bringing to bear his formidable legal and journalistic expertise on the tumultuous
events unfolding around him, Tourgée ... It was near Greensboro that the largest
force of Civil War troops surrendered under Joseph E. Johnson some two weeks
 ...

Author: Sharon D. Kennedy-Nolle

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 9781469621081

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 428

View: 988

After the Civil War, the South was divided into five military districts occupied by Union forces. Out of these regions, a remarkable group of writers emerged. Experiencing the long-lasting ramifications of Reconstruction firsthand, many of these writers sought to translate the era's promise into practice. In fiction, newspaper journalism, and other forms of literature, authors including George Washington Cable, Albion Tourgee, Constance Fenimore Woolson, and Octave Thanet imagined a new South in which freedpeople could prosper as citizens with agency. Radically re-envisioning the role of women in the home, workforce, and marketplace, these writers also made gender a vital concern of their work. Still, working from the South, the authors were often subject to the whims of a northern literary market. Their visions of citizenship depended on their readership's deference to conventional claims of duty, labor, reputation, and property ownership. The circumstances surrounding the production and circulation of their writing blunted the full impact of the period's literary imagination and fostered a drift into the stereotypical depictions and other strictures that marked the rise of Jim Crow. Sharon D. Kennedy-Nolle blends literary history with archival research to assess the significance of Reconstruction literature as a genre. Founded on witness and dream, the pathbreaking work of its writers made an enduring, if at times contradictory, contribution to American literature and history.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Albion W Tourg e

Albion W  Tourg  e

... I settled near Greensboro, N. C., in the hope that a milder climate might aid me
to prolong a life somewhat shattered by ... the contrast between these pre-notions
and what I saw of the life around me, and the fresh relics of the life which had ...

Author: Martin Ernst Hillger

Publisher: Ardent Media

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 628

View: 186

Categories:

Putting Life on the Finish Line

Putting Life on the Finish Line

... and I was hired to teach and coach three sports at Northeast Guilford Junior
High School near Greensboro, North Carolina. ... after the regular afternoon
school games and even in the evening hours at various school sites around the
county.

Author: Joe Sinclair

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN: 9781491706084

Category: Self-Help

Page: 206

View: 931

A guide for those interested in staying physically active, and written by a long distance endurance athlete with a passion for running. When author Joe Sinclair turned sixty-two years old, he began his quest to run as many marathons as possible. Less than five years later, he has logged more than four thousand miles, participating in more than 150 marathons. In his memoir, Putting Life on the Finish Line, he tells his life story from his early years through his late sixties and details how he achieved his running goals. Sinclair shares running’s rewards and challenges—crossing the finish line at the toughest marathon in America run entirely on asphalt; completing three marathons in three days in the hot July weather; fighting off attacks by vicious dogs during a lonely, rural, mountain marathon; and helping a struggling young marathoner achieve his very first marathon finish. Offering personal secrets for success, tips and tricks, nutritional and fitness plans, pre-race plans, and inspiring stories, Putting Life on the Finish Line provides encouragement for those who believe they are too old to accomplish a dream. It shows that personal health and fitness is attainable at any age.
Categories: Self-Help

American Religious Leaders

American Religious Leaders

... helping to organize sit-ins and other demonstrations against racial segregation
in and around Greensboro. After his 1964 graduation from college, where he had
been student body president and quarterback of the football team, he enrolled ...

Author: Timothy L. Hall

Publisher: Infobase Publishing

ISBN: 9781438108063

Category: Religious leaders

Page: 449

View: 732

Provides biographical information on more than 270 individuals important to the religious community, having dedicated their lives to religious teaching in various forms, such as evangelism, founding schools and debating the relationship between church and state.
Categories: Religious leaders

SEVENTY SEVEN YEARS IN DIXIE

SEVENTY SEVEN YEARS IN DIXIE

The night of the fourth day's marchwe were up near Greensboro,where wehalted
about 9o'clock and were ordered to stack ... Some of the boysyelled to the officer
to bring rations around, that they had not eaten anything intwo days—it is true to ...

Author: John Dewayne Lanham, Sr. “Possum”

Publisher: Page Publishing Inc

ISBN: 9781628384970

Category: Fiction

Page: 70

View: 167

“Seventy-seven Years in Dixie: The Boys in Gray of 61-65” by H.W. Reddick is a poetic, sweeping epic chronicling one young man's experience fighting the Yankees in the American Civil War. Following him through battles and time spent as a prisoner of war, we experience alongside him aching hunger, terror before battle and the humanizing moments that come when, stuck alongside brothers, young soldiers see what makes each of us human. Complete with a series of poems celebrating the heroism of those who fought the war that split the States, we celebrate moments of triumph-- a taste of buttermilk after days of hunger, new shoes in winter and a night's sleep indoors. A testament to those who've fought for our freedoms, “Seventy-Seven Years” is as much an adventure as it is a reminder of our nation's powerful history.
Categories: Fiction

Guarding Greensboro

Guarding Greensboro

They were meeting in Greensboro on May 12 to dedicate a new monument to the
Confederate soldier . ... Their story - told around dinner tables , recounted 227 by
Captain Williams in the newspapers , passed from one CHAPTER ELEVEN: ...

Author: G. Ward Hubbs

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820325058

Category: History

Page: 325

View: 727

Historian G. Ward Hubbs first encountered the Confederate soldiers known as the Greensboro Guards through their Civil War diaries and letters. Later he discovered that the Guards had formed some forty years before the war, soon after the founding of the Alabama town that was their namesake. Guarding Greensboro examines how the yearning for community played itself out across decades of peace and war, prosperity and want. Greensboro sprang up as a wide-open frontier town in Alabama's Black Belt, an exceptionally fertile part of the Deep South where people who dreamed of making it rich as cotton planters flocked. Although prewar Greensboro had its share of overlapping communities--ranging from Masons to school-improvement societies--it was the Guards who brought together the town's highly individualistic citizenry. A typical prewar militia unit, the Guards mustered irregularly and marched in their finest regalia on patriotic holidays. Most significantly, they patrolled for hostile Indians and rebellious slaves. In protecting the entire white population against common foes, Hubbs argues, the Guards did what Greensboro's other voluntary associations could not: move citizens beyond self-interest. As Hubbs follows the Guards through their Civil War campaigns, he keeps an eye on the home front: on how Greensborians shared a sense of purpose and sacrifice while they dealt with fears of a restive slave populace. Finally, Hubbs discusses the postwar readjustments of Greensboro's veterans as he examines the political and social upheaval in their town and throughout the South. Ultimately, Hubbs argues, the Civil War created the South of legend and its distinctive communities.
Categories: History

Geological Survey Water supply Paper

Geological Survey Water supply Paper

4 29 | 201 South Buffalo Creek near Greensboro , N . C . Min 11 3 . 4 7 . 2 275 6 .
5 81 | 32 1 . 8 10 1 402 4 . 8 127 I 20 0 . . 00 3 . 8 6 . 3 | 681 878 111 95 4661 301
3 , 600 17 . 11 132 2 . 2 ) 772 Avg 54 35 4 . 3 7 . 5 116 202 North Buffalo Creek ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UCAL:B3429962

Category: Irrigation

Page:

View: 685

Categories: Irrigation